On Posting Mistakes

I’ve posted a lot online since 2005. When I post I’m careful with my words.

So I’ve been following the Joe Paterno firing and quickly thereafter, passing, with interest (fair disclosure, I am a fan of PSU, JoePA, believe he was dismissed unfairly, and my father is a Hall of Fame coach on the HS level serving one community for 30+ years, so I relate to the Paterno’s on my own level).

On Friday, I came across an article by Anna Heim, “CBS fires sports blogger following Twitter-based misstep on Paterno’s death” on my The Next Web feed. In it Heim wrote, “As you may remember, CBS Sports wrongly announced the death of the ex-Penn State American football coach Joe Paterno – who had recently been accused of child sex abuse.”

I was incensed, posted to my friends on Facebook and asked who would be fired next?

I clicked on the author’s name and found her Twitter feed. She had tweeted the article link so I replied to it writing, “@abracarioca @TheNextWeb your facts are wrong, paterno was not accused of doing anything wrong, you should correct this story”

She replied, “@RossNunamaker @TheNextWeb I just did, one word was missing, sorry about that”

Today the article section quoted above read, “As you may remember, CBS Sports wrongly announced the death of the ex-Penn State American football coach Joe Paterno – who had recently been blamed for not doing enough to report child sex abuse.”

There was no reference that the article was edited after being posted and no apology in the article for the misrepresentation. What disgusts me is that her answer came across flippant regarding her false accusation that a beloved dead man had been accused of child sex abuse in a post on a site with a large readership. And she was trying to defend bloggers.

Advertisements

Comments are closed.